Will a COVID-19 Vaccine be Mandatory?

A syringe with a golden liquid inside is held up with two hands by a faceless and blurry doctor with brown skin.

Vaccines in some form or another have existed since the early 1000s, though they are commonly thought to have been brought into vogue by Edward Jenner starting in 1796 with the use of cowpox as a vaccine for smallpox. While laws on the mandatory nature of vaccines have fluctuated over time and vary between jurisdictions,… Continue reading Will a COVID-19 Vaccine be Mandatory?

AI Bias in Healthcare

A man in a doctor's coat and a man in a business suit stand in front of a window. Both are looking at a third party who is off screen.

I've talked about AI Ethics in the past- about how AI is not unbaised, but rather takes our biases and amplifies them, because AI and ML (Machine Learning) algorithms must be programmed in the first place. They centralize decision making, and create "black boxes" that are often unparseable to their users. Even proliferation of bias in… Continue reading AI Bias in Healthcare

What should an “Intersectional Approach” look like in a healthcare setting?

I identify as an intersectional feminist. This is partially I think due to the timing at which I entered the academy/wider world and was exposed to feminism and partially because I, as a privileged white woman, recognize that my struggles are not the be and and end all of oppression- and not even close. But… Continue reading What should an “Intersectional Approach” look like in a healthcare setting?

Safety vs. Non-Discrimination: We can have both!

A needle is drawing blood from an arm on a pink blanket. The arm has a yellow rubber tourniquet on it.

As per the regular news cycle, recently in Canada there have been renewed calls for the blood donation process to be less discriminatory towards the LGTBQ+ community. A few weeks ago a non-binary person came forward with a story about being refused as a donor (unless they were willing to disclose their entire medical history)… Continue reading Safety vs. Non-Discrimination: We can have both!

The Dangers of Policy

Last week I had the privilege to attend the Canadian Bioethics' Society yearly conference, and present my work on poetry and microethics. During the week, I made some great connections with fellow bioethicists, healthcare practitioners, and patients. Many challenges with how healthcare is currently practiced were raised and discussed, and I'm sure more than a… Continue reading The Dangers of Policy

A Speech Against Doug Ford

Today, I attended the Ontario General Strike Protest against Doug Ford's government. Unfortunately, I was unable to get a video, but this is  a transcript of the speech I gave:   I am here because I want us to think today, about what the purpose of government is, about why we want to be governed.… Continue reading A Speech Against Doug Ford

Ethics of Being a Good Employer

As an Ontarian, I have resigned myself to three more years of utter shame and disappointment in my government. I have resigned myself to terrible slogans, abhorrent commentary, and a total lack of compassion for the average person. I have not resigned myself to not being able to do anything about it. So, Ford wants… Continue reading Ethics of Being a Good Employer

How to Promote Autonomy

In the past, I've discussed a number of issues related to paternalism, autonomy, and end-of-life decision making. These are all challenging subjects, where determinations need to be made by individuals and their families, as well as by governments about what sorts of decisions should be made available to people, and what decisions individuals can make… Continue reading How to Promote Autonomy

Fitbits, Insurance, and Discrimination

So, I woke up this morning to this lovely article from CBC detailing how the FEDERAL GOVERNMENT is looking into using FitBit trackers to incentivise workers into healthy activities as a means to cut healthcare insurance costs. Now, this, when I read it was shocking and appalling and OBVIOUSLY TERRIBLE, but apparently the FEDERAL GOVERNMENT… Continue reading Fitbits, Insurance, and Discrimination

The Murky Waters of Patient-hood

Normally I write about healthcare ethics, and ethics more broadly from an outsider perspective. I write about philosophical theories, and hypotheticals, and news articles, and not about myself. This is because I'm highly privileged (white, moderately well-off despite the student thing, some minor problems with anxiety and panic attacks but no flare ups in a… Continue reading The Murky Waters of Patient-hood