Cute Enough for a Kidney?

One of the (many) major disruptions that social media has brought to our modern world is the ability of ordinary persons to reach out to large groups of people for support. Sometimes, this support looks like a ko-fi or a patreon page. Sometimes it looks like a kickstarter for a new business idea or a… Continue reading Cute Enough for a Kidney?

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Redefining the Purpose of Medicine

Medicine is a multi-faceted and complex field, made even more complex by political and social realities which influence our health and our access to healthcare. Usually, when we think of medicine we think about it straightforwardly, however. We think about going to the doctor or hospital, being prescribed some medicine or undergoing some treatment or… Continue reading Redefining the Purpose of Medicine

On Millennial Burnout, Habits, and the Virtues to which we hold Ourselves

In 2019, I pledged, along with a small group of writers on Twitter, to do 20 push-ups a day this year, such that by the time 2019 has ended I will have done 7300 push-ups. It is a commitment I am holding myself to because I want to improve my physicality, and it is something… Continue reading On Millennial Burnout, Habits, and the Virtues to which we hold Ourselves

The Ethics of Compromise

Welcome back to Moral Guillotines, and to 2019. The world is still a trashfire. BUT it is at least still a trashfire in interesting, philosophically relevant ways, which is something. Today, I was prompted to explore an area of ethics that I will call the ethics of compromise/negotiation. This is for a number of politically… Continue reading The Ethics of Compromise

A Gift to You

Welcome to the final Moral Guillotines of 2018! I'll be taking December off, for myself and for my creative writing, and resume again on January 1st. This year has been pretty exciting for me- I've started my Ph.D, ramped up my involvement in the SFF community, and started teaching aerials part-time (both because I enjoy… Continue reading A Gift to You

PTSD and Post-War Justice

I am deep in PhD. course deadline season. Last week, you got a peek at one area of literature that I'm using for a final project and paper, and this week, we're going to switch gears to another. I went out on a limb this term and took a course of Post-War Justice. It has… Continue reading PTSD and Post-War Justice

A Primer on Microethics

A few weeks ago, I gave you all a crash course in the first (and what is considered to be the most basic) form of bioethics: principalism. We talked about some various reasons why principalism might not go far enough with the principles it chooses to include, and we posited some additional principles that might… Continue reading A Primer on Microethics

Cannabis, Obesity, and Trust’s Role in Healthcare

Welcome to cannabis legalization Canada, a place where there are approximately 100 cannabis thinkpieces per day that range the gamut from where the shortages are to how cannabis will impact employment practices and relationships. In addition to these though, I have noticed a concerning trend of stories, where cannabis use is seen by doctors as… Continue reading Cannabis, Obesity, and Trust’s Role in Healthcare

New Principles for Bioethics

The more I study ethics, the more I think that the fundamental problem is simply this: How to get people to care about others. But in the lack of an answer to that question (and I don't have one, let me know if you do), we rely on theories and principles so that individuals who… Continue reading New Principles for Bioethics

Transparency vs. Privacy

I just got back from an amazing week of travel, including attending Can*Con 2018, an amazing conference for Science Fiction and Fantasy in Ottawa, ON. This conference was my first time as a panelist, and even though I was there as a writer, a lot of what I spoke on was philosophy (this con likes… Continue reading Transparency vs. Privacy