PTSD and Post-War Justice

I am deep in PhD. course deadline season. Last week, you got a peek at one area of literature that I'm using for a final project and paper, and this week, we're going to switch gears to another. I went out on a limb this term and took a course of Post-War Justice. It has… Continue reading PTSD and Post-War Justice

Advertisements

A Primer on Microethics

A few weeks ago, I gave you all a crash course in the first (and what is considered to be the most basic) form of bioethics: principalism. We talked about some various reasons why principalism might not go far enough with the principles it chooses to include, and we posited some additional principles that might… Continue reading A Primer on Microethics

New Principles for Bioethics

The more I study ethics, the more I think that the fundamental problem is simply this: How to get people to care about others. But in the lack of an answer to that question (and I don't have one, let me know if you do), we rely on theories and principles so that individuals who… Continue reading New Principles for Bioethics

With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility

I've spoken before about how power enters into considerations of morality- from fiduciary responsibilities, to responsibilities we have as carers and parents, to how power means that certain relationships are barred to us if we want to behave in ethical ways. Today, I want to examine some reasons we have for this, essentially why we… Continue reading With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility

Autonomy- A Useful Fiction?

I've talked before at length about autonomy, and it's corollary, paternalism. I've also mentioned some problems with free will, and how we may be able to solve it with compatibilism. Today, I want to tie all of these threads together in light of an article I read in my feminist bioethics class. Autonomy Autonomy is… Continue reading Autonomy- A Useful Fiction?

Why Inaction is Action

One of the goals of developing an ethical system is usually that that system will be internally consistent. Another is that it will provide a map for making decisions in the moral sphere that will not lead to two different decisions. However, that does not mean that it always ends up with the same decision,… Continue reading Why Inaction is Action

Better than we Are

Aristotle was the first (known) philosopher to posit that we can become better people. He thought we could do this by modifying our actions in such a way that acting morally became an unconscious habit, and that we could know what morality was by watching paragons of virtue and imitating them. Now, the interesting things (for today's… Continue reading Better than we Are

Morally Grey Contexts & Policy Implications

A couple weeks ago, I introduced you all the ideas of moral and immoral contexts. The idea that sometimes we live in a society in which does not punish immoral behavior, and sometimes we live in a society that does. But we can imagine a third kind of context- a context where ostensibly our society punishes… Continue reading Morally Grey Contexts & Policy Implications

When Parental Rights End aka. Keep the New Ontario Sex-Ed Curriculum

It seems to be a commonly known fact that Western society (and in particular, the USA), hates children. Recently, I have also seen push-back against feminists like myself, who say they hate children. However, in my experience these are two very different types of hatred. My hatred is personal. I think children are sticky and… Continue reading When Parental Rights End aka. Keep the New Ontario Sex-Ed Curriculum

Inclusion in Design

Most of my friends would say I'm an imaginative person. This isn't to brag, as its a skill I have cultivated, and one that is necessary to being a writer and a philosopher. It's a skill that enables me to look at an issue from a variety of viewpoints and extrapolate possible consequences, and pick… Continue reading Inclusion in Design