Open-Source Publishing Op-Ed

Welcome to Tuesday! To take a break from the bioethics bummers that have been my posts for the last few weeks, this is an op-ed I wrote on Open-Source Publishing in academia last semester. 🙂 A Defense of Open-Access Publishing Open-access scholarship is a requirement if we want to produce and use objective knowledge in… Continue reading Open-Source Publishing Op-Ed

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Redefining the Purpose of Medicine

Medicine is a multi-faceted and complex field, made even more complex by political and social realities which influence our health and our access to healthcare. Usually, when we think of medicine we think about it straightforwardly, however. We think about going to the doctor or hospital, being prescribed some medicine or undergoing some treatment or… Continue reading Redefining the Purpose of Medicine

On Millennial Burnout, Habits, and the Virtues to which we hold Ourselves

In 2019, I pledged, along with a small group of writers on Twitter, to do 20 push-ups a day this year, such that by the time 2019 has ended I will have done 7300 push-ups. It is a commitment I am holding myself to because I want to improve my physicality, and it is something… Continue reading On Millennial Burnout, Habits, and the Virtues to which we hold Ourselves

The Ethics of Compromise

Welcome back to Moral Guillotines, and to 2019. The world is still a trashfire. BUT it is at least still a trashfire in interesting, philosophically relevant ways, which is something. Today, I was prompted to explore an area of ethics that I will call the ethics of compromise/negotiation. This is for a number of politically… Continue reading The Ethics of Compromise

PTSD and Post-War Justice

I am deep in PhD. course deadline season. Last week, you got a peek at one area of literature that I'm using for a final project and paper, and this week, we're going to switch gears to another. I went out on a limb this term and took a course of Post-War Justice. It has… Continue reading PTSD and Post-War Justice

A Primer on Microethics

A few weeks ago, I gave you all a crash course in the first (and what is considered to be the most basic) form of bioethics: principalism. We talked about some various reasons why principalism might not go far enough with the principles it chooses to include, and we posited some additional principles that might… Continue reading A Primer on Microethics

New Principles for Bioethics

The more I study ethics, the more I think that the fundamental problem is simply this: How to get people to care about others. But in the lack of an answer to that question (and I don't have one, let me know if you do), we rely on theories and principles so that individuals who… Continue reading New Principles for Bioethics

With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility

I've spoken before about how power enters into considerations of morality- from fiduciary responsibilities, to responsibilities we have as carers and parents, to how power means that certain relationships are barred to us if we want to behave in ethical ways. Today, I want to examine some reasons we have for this, essentially why we… Continue reading With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility

Autonomy- A Useful Fiction?

I've talked before at length about autonomy, and it's corollary, paternalism. I've also mentioned some problems with free will, and how we may be able to solve it with compatibilism. Today, I want to tie all of these threads together in light of an article I read in my feminist bioethics class. Autonomy Autonomy is… Continue reading Autonomy- A Useful Fiction?

Why Inaction is Action

One of the goals of developing an ethical system is usually that that system will be internally consistent. Another is that it will provide a map for making decisions in the moral sphere that will not lead to two different decisions. However, that does not mean that it always ends up with the same decision,… Continue reading Why Inaction is Action